Cheka

On January 16 the presidium of VCheKa approved the draft on the establishment of the Politburo at Uyezd militsiya. mehr

Ministry of Internal Affairs (Russia)

Having won the October Revolution, the Bolsheviks disbanded the "tsarist" police forces and formed all-proletarian "Workers' and Peasants' Militsiya" under NKVD of the Russian SFSR. mehr

Ministry of Internal Affairs (Russia)

By the mid-1980s, the image of the "people's militsiya" was largely compromised by the corruption and disorderly behaviour of both enlisted and officer staff (the most shocking case was the robbery and murder of a KGB operative by a gang of militiamen stationed in Moscow Metro in 1983). mehr

Ministry of Internal Affairs (Russia)

It currently controls the politsiya (formerly militsiya), the Main Directorate for Road Traffic Safety, and the Internal Troops. mehr

Spetsnaz

The forces deployed were elite personnel from the Federal Security Service's ("FSB's"), Alpha Group, alongside MVD militsiya and Internal Troops. mehr

Spetsnaz

In addition to Internal Troops, the MVD has Politsiya (formerly Militsiya) police special forces stationed in nearly every Russian city. mehr

Todor Zhivkov

After 9 September 1944, Zhivkov became head of the Sofia police force, restyled as the "Narodna Militsiya" (People's Militia). mehr

Highway patrol

In Russia, traffic policing on highways is the responsibility of the GIBDD section of the Politsiya (formerly Militsiya) and the Public Security Service of the MVD. mehr

Alexandra Marinina

(Kandidat of Law degree) in 1986. She resigned from the "militsiya" system (a semi-formal term for the set of MVD organizations) in February, 1998 to become a full-time writer. Before her resignation, she had the rank of the lieutenant colonel of militsiya. mehr

Alexandra Marinina

Marinina started writing in 1991, when, together with her colleague Alexander Gorkin, she wrote a detective story that was published in magazine "Militsiya". In December 1992, she finished her first novel "Confluence of Circumstances" which was also published in "Militsiya" magazine, in 1993. mehr

Alexandra Marinina

In 1995 Marinina received the prize of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia for the best book about the work of the Russian militsiya, for the books "Death for the Sake of Death" and "Away Game". mehr

Prosecutor

Conversely, the policing systems in socialist countries, such as the Militsiya of the Soviet Union, were not aimed at fulfilling the same roles as police forces in Western democracies. mehr

Demographic history of Macedonia

Former IMRO members were hunted by the Communist Militsiya and many of them imprisoned, repressed, exiled or killed. mehr

Commissar

Until the late 1930s, the People's Militsiya and Internal Troops of the NKVD had no personal ranks, and used many various position-ranks instead. In 1935, the Militsiya created a special system of personal ranks that was a blend of standard military ranks and position-ranks; this system was largely reused by the newly created Main Directorate of State Security (GUGB) in their rank structure, although they had Commissar-style ranks for top officers in place of Militsiya-style "inspector" and "director". mehr

Commissar

From 1943, the Militsiya switched to a new rank system and insignia introduced in the Soviet Army. Instead of General ranks, top officers used "Commissar of Militsiya" 3rd, 2nd, and 1st rank, even though they used army-standard Major General, Lieutenant General and Colonel General shoulder boards. mehr

Varlam Shalamov

By train he was taken to the former Solikamsk monastery (Solikamsk), which was transformed into a militsiya headquarters of the Vishera department of Solovki ITL OGPU (VishLAG). mehr

Gorky Park (novel)

The story follows Arkady Renko, a chief investigator for the Militsiya, who is assigned to a case involving three corpses found in Gorky Park, an amusement park in Moscow, who have had their faces and fingertips cut off by the murderer to prevent identification. mehr

Kiev Metro

Public order is maintained with Militsiya (police) personnel on all stations and metro security staff at some stations and transfer points. mehr

Security Service of Ukraine

They claimed to have prevented militsiya from violently suppressing the protests, contradicting the orders of President Kuchma and threatening "militsiya" with armed involvement of SBU's special forces units. mehr

Education in the Soviet Union

Numerous military and "militsiya" (police) schools (, "vyshee uchilische/shkola") were on the same higher level. Note that Soviet military and "militsiya" facilities named "Academy" (, "Akademiya") were not a degree-level school (like Western military academies such as West Point), but a post-graduate school for experienced officers. mehr

Education in the Soviet Union

Military, "militsiya", KGB and Party schools were also graded according to these levels. mehr

Propiska in the Soviet Union

Propiska was documented in local police (Militsiya) registers and certified with a stamp in internal passports. mehr

Militsiya

"Militsiya" or "militia" (, , , , , , , , , ), often confused with militia, is used as an official name of the civilian police in several former communist states. mehr

Militsiya

The militsiya was reaffirmed on October 28 (November 10, according to the new style dating), 1917 under the official name of the Workers' and Peasants' Militsiya, in further contrast to what the Bolsheviks called the "bourgeois class protecting" police. Eventually, it was replaced by the Ministry of Internal Affairs (Russian: МВД, "MVD"; Ukrainian: МВС, "MVS"; Belorussian: МУС, "MUS"), which is now the official full name for the militsiya forces in the respective countries. mehr

Militsiya

The Soviet and successor MVDs have usually been headed by a militsiya general and predominantly consist of service personnel, with civilian employees only filling auxiliary posts. Local militsiya departments are subordinated to their regional departments, having little accountability before local authorities. mehr

Militsiya

The official names of particular militsiya bodies and services in post-Soviet countries are usually very complicated, hence the use of the short term militsiya. Laws usually refer to police just as militsiya. mehr

Militsiya

The police are still called Militsiya in Belarus, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan, but in Kyrgyzstan there is an active discussion about renaming the police force from Militsiya to Police. mehr

Militsiya

The organizational structure, methods and traditions of the militsiya differ significantly from those of western police. Militsiya as an organization consists of many functional departments, such as the GIBDD, a traffic police. Organized crime detectives form highly independent squads inside regional militsiya. Some units may have the distinctive names (like OMON in Russia) which are more specific than "militsiya" or "militsioner". mehr

Militsiya

Militsiya personnel ranks mostly follow those of the Army – from private (Rus: "ryadovoy"), which is the lowest rank, to colonel general – with only these exceptions: there are no ranks of Army General and Marshal. The militsiya of an oblast (or other equivalent subnational entity) is usually headed by a general. The rank name is suffixed with "of militsiya" (e.g. "major of militsiya" for a major). Militsiya personnel carry firearms, but are not permitted to carry their weapons when they are off duty. mehr

Militsiya

GIBDD (the traffic militsiya) is the only exception: its members drive their own (or even own private) cars and are specially trained in risk-driving. mehr

Militsiya

One unique feature of militsiya policing approach is the system of territorial patronage over citizens. "Uchastkovyi" is also the main, and actually the real, militsiya force in remote areas and small settlements where permanent police departments are not created. mehr

Militsiya

Although women constitute a significant proportion of militsiya staff, they are usually not permitted to fill positions that carry risks (such as patrolman, guard, SWAT), but are allowed to carry firearms for self-defense. mehr

Militsiya

Another unique militsiya feature is the use of conscripted soldiers from the Internal Troops for regular urban policing. The soldiers typically wear standard grey militsiya uniforms, however they are authorized to wear a green military uniform and will sometimes even wear armor vests and protective helmets on their policing duties. mehr

Militsiya

Until late 1936, the People's Militsiya and Internal Troops of the NKVD had no personal ranks, much akin to the Red Army, Red Navy, and OGPU, and used position-ranks. When personal ranks were reintroduced in the military in 1935, the Militsiya created a curious rank system that was a blend of standard military ranks such as Sergeant, Lieutenant, Capitan and Major, and old positional ranks like 'squad leader', 'inspector', and 'director', some with several grades like 'senior' or 'junior'. mehr

Militsiya

New insignia were issued to GUGB in 1937 and to Militsiya in 1939. It was now based on collar rank patches of the Red Army and Internal Troops. Confusingly, the special NKVD rank system was left intact, so for example "Captain of Militsiya/State Security" was assigned the three-box insignia of an army Colonel (in the Red Army, this patch was reassigned to Lieutenant Colonel in September 1939, but the NKVD did not alter their insignia) and "Major of Militsiya/State Security" was mapped to one-romb insignia of "Kombrig" (a brigade commander) (which was abolished for commanding officers of the Red Army in May 1940). mehr

Militsiya

The ranks now copied those of the Soviet Army, with the exception of top officers starting with 'Senior Major' who were renamed Commissar of Militsiya 3rd, 2nd, and 1st rank, although they still wore army-style Major General, Lieutenant General and Colonel General shoulder boards. mehr

Militsiya

Militsiya retained commissar ranks until 1973. mehr

Militsiya

Ranks of militsiya are considered special ranks, not to be confused with military (all-forces) ranks, which are used by the internal troops of MVD. All militsiya ranks have the words "of militsiya" at the end, which are part of the rank name and not a descriptive addition. mehr

Militsiya

These non-police services should be distinguished from the militsiya itself, except passport and registration service, which structures are often included into "OVD" and sometimes considered as one of the important militsiya services. Their members have always used different generic names and specific ranks (e.g. "Major of the Internal Service", rather than "Major of Militsiya"). mehr

Militsiya

It controlled the Militsiya, the State Road Inspection Service ("GAI"), and the Internal Troops. mehr

Militsiya

In a 1995 poll of the public, only 5% of respondents expressed confidence in the ability of the militsiya to deal with crime in their city. Human rights organizations have accused the Moscow militsiya of racism in singling out non-Slavic individuals (especially immigrants from Russia's Caucasus republics), physical attacks, unjustified detention, and other rights violations. mehr

Militsiya

For example, if the officer of militsiya is removing to the Internal Troops. Another case: if it is necessary to promote the officer into the higher rank which is absent in militsiya ranks or in ranks of other special service. mehr

Militsiya

The Day of Russian Militsiya is held on November 10. mehr

Militsiya

In August 2010, President Dmitry Medvedev introduced new legislation to reform and centralize the funding of the militsiya, as well as to officially change the militsiya's name to "Police" (the term which was used in the Russian Empire). mehr

Militsiya

The term Militsiya is still used in several countries of the former Soviet Union. In Belarus, in addition to the Militsiya, law enforcement is also the responsibility of other agencies such as the Presidential Guard and the State Security Committee (KGB), all under the authority of the country's Ministry of Internal Affairs. mehr

Aleksandr Antonov (politician)

At first, he came back to the plant where he started his career, but soon was elected to the post of the head of the Governorate Militia (police), a predecessor of the militsiya. mehr

Alu Alkhanov

He joined the Soviet Militsiya service in 1983, graduating from the transport police school in Mogilev (now Mahilyow in Belarus). mehr

OMON

It was created as the special forces of the Soviet Militsiya in 1988, and then played major roles in several armed conflicts during and following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. mehr

OMON

The current OMON system is the successor of that group and was founded on October 3, 1988 in Moscow and was called the Militsiya Squad of Special Assignment. mehr

Budyonnovsk hospital hostage crisis

The forces employed were MVD police ("militsiya") and Internal Troops, along with spetsnaz (special forces) from the Federal Security Service (FSB), including the elite Alpha Group. mehr
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